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Boat and Sailing Ship Weather Vanes
Sailboat, Clipper Ship, Mayflower

Made in the U.S.A.

Because our nation had its beginnings in settlements and towns along the eastern coastline, many of the early weather vanes were replicas of the ships that sailed the Atlantic Ocean. And when weathervane manufacturer Cushing & White of Waltham, MA, wanted certain designs carved for molds, he hired E. Warren Hastings, a Boston figurehead carver. "Where sailing is a business, wind direction is important, weathervanes are appropriate, and sailing vessel vanes particularly popular," says Myrna Kaye, in her book "Yankee Weather Vanes."

Ketch Sailboat Weather Vane

Our Sailboat Weather Vane is a 3-dimensional model of what is termed a Ketch, a sailing craft with two masts: a main mast, and a shorter mizzen mast rearward of the main mast.

This sailboat is nicely detailed, quite durable and will "sail" perfectly into the wind as any good weathervane should.




ITEM: S26 Sailboat Weather Vane
Full-bodied
Ornament is 26" long x 28" high
Complete weathervane will stand about 4' above roof
$1,650 complete

Mayflower Weather Vane

The Mayflower was a typical square-rigged ship, first recorded in 1609 as a 180-ton merchant ship. It often sailed to Norway and the Baltic states, and later to the Mediterranean for wine and spice trading. It was hired in 1620 for its most famous voyage - transporting the Pilgrims to New England. That difficult winter the Pilgrims stayed on board with the crew, and the ship did not arrive back in England until the following spring of 1621. After a few more trading trips, its Captain Christopher Jones died, and the Mayflower was docked until 1624 when it was sold for its wood. There is a tradition that many of the Mayflower timbers were used in the construction of a barn at a Quaker settlement, northwest of London. Jordan's Barn, now called the Mayflower Barn, still stands, and is used for wedding receptions, social occasions, and meetings.

ITEM: S34 Mayflower Weather Vane
Full-bodied
Ornament is 34" long x 34" high
Complete weathervane will stand about 4 1/2' above roof
Special Order - call for pricing
Clipper Ship Weather Vane

In the United States the term "clipper" referred to a topsail schooner of the 19th century. The "Cutty Sark" is a fine example of this type of sailing ship. This small, multiple-masted fast ship was ideally suited to smaller cargoes or to high-profit and luxury goods, such as spices, tea, people and mail. Generally narrow for its length and small by later standards, the clipper ship had a large sail area - as you can see in our fully-rigged Clipper Ship weather vane that comes in two sizes.

ITEMS:
S28 Clipper Ship Weather Vane
Full-bodied
Ornament is 28" long x 25" high
Complete weathervane will stand about 3 1/2' - 4' above roof
$1,795 complete

S36 Clipper Ship Weather Vane
Full-bodied
Ornament is 36" long x 28" high
Complete weathervane will stand about 4 1/2' - 5' above roof
$2,253 complete

Order a Weather Vane

Each Weather Vane includes your choice of either:

With NSEW Directionals
Denninger Westervelt Banner with NSEW Directionals
  • Copper and brass weathervane ornament
  • Pair of copper globes
  • Cast brass NSEW directionals
  • Solid stainless steel rod painted black (or to upgrade to a brass sleeve covering add $75)
This is the traditional and most popular set-up for weather vanes.
OR
With a Large Globe
Denninger Westervelt Banner Weather Vane with Globe
  • Copper and brass weathervane ornament
  • One large impressive copper globe
  • Solid stainless steel rod painted black (or to upgrade to a brass sleeve covering add $75)

This style was popular from the 1700's right up to the Victorian era, and is also very striking with contemporary vanes.

Each Weather Vane comes with a standard stainless steel rod suitable for Mounting Diagram A or B:

Mounting Diagram #1
Diagram A - Headblock only

Traditional mounting of a weather vane into the solid headblock of a cupola, tower, turret or gazebo, or into the ridgepole of a roof.


This is the "old fashioned" traditional way of mounting a weather vane. It is still suitable today for smaller vanes up to 36" wide. Our basic 28 1/2" rod allows for at least 8" - 9" of rod to be wedged and caulked into a solid headblock or ridgepole, and 16" - 20" of rod exposed above the apex of roof.

Mounting Diagram #4
Diagram B - Headblock & Brace

A preferred traditional mount into the solid headblock of a cupola, tower, turret or gazebo, or into the ridgepole of a roof using a brace for extra strength.

Prepare your roof ahead with this headblock and brace system, for an easy and very secure mount. This mount is suitable for any size weather vane. Our basic 28 1/2" rod allows for at least 8" - 9"of rod inside the roof, and 16" - 20" of rod exposed above the apex of the roof. A nail is used to pin the rod to the brace. Larger sized vanes will need proportionally heavier and longer rods.

NOTE:
Installation may vary with each building.
It is very important to us that you are able to properly mount your weathervane
so you can enjoy it for generations to come.
Please contact us for mounting advice before you order - 870-204-4791
See our Mounting Diagrams for even more options.


Options:

Go to Custom Patina Page
Patina
Verdigris
or Black
Go to Custom Guilding Page
Gilding

23k Gold Leaf
Go to Add an Arrow Page
Add an Arrow
to a design

Go to Denninger Caps
Copper roof caps


Go to Custom Directionals
Custom directionals or cardinals
Go to Custom Garniture
Garniture
Go to Custom Transition Pieces
Transition pieces


Of course, we can modify anything
(yes anything) including: size, shape etc.
Just consider it a custom design.
Call Al or Beth at 870-204-4791

Shipping:

Shipped in the USA and Worldwide via UPS or best way.
Your shipping costs will only be the actual carrier charges,determined upon size and weight of packed carton(s).
Largest sizes may require a wooden crate, and item will be sent via Truck.
Call for delivery schedule - each item is individually handcrafted for you.

We use recycled and repurposed packing materials whenever possible.
Save the Earth - Recycle

Order a Weather Vane



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Alfred H. and Beth R. Denninger, Webmasters
Denninger Weather Vanes & Finials, 3773 Marion County 160, Theodosia, MO. 65761 USA
870-204-4791 | 417-712-4991 alfred@denninger.com
All contents © 1988-2016 AHD. All Rights Reserved.
Copying of our original material, photos or designs without permission is strictly prohibited.
www.denninger.com "The Weather Vane Home Page" has been online since Feb. 27, 1996